General Hosts Launch of the Desmond Tutu Program to End Global Hunger

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Last night at General Seminary, the Rev. Canon Nontombi Naomi Tutu and other leaders at Conservation South Africa, FreshMinistries, and the Anglican Communion met at Chelsea Square for the launch of the Desmond Tutu Program to End Global Hunger.

Canon Tutu preached a riveting sermon, urging those gathered to join in the work of ending global hunger as an action of their faith. “We show our love for Jesus maybe not by jumping out of boats, like Simon Peter. But we show it by loving those who seem unlovable. We show it by caring for those who are hungry. We show it by speaking out when we see injustice. We show it by reaching out our hand to those in need – and even those who look at us with disdain. All of us are that Simon Peter, jumping out of the boat through acts of compassion, by acts of faith.” 

The Rev. Canon Nontombi Naomi Tutu (center) with professors and students from General at the program launch.

The Rev. Canon Nontombi Naomi Tutu (center) with professors and students from General at the program launch.

Professors and students from General Seminary participated in the event, including the Rev. Dr. Michael Battle, Director of the Desmond Tutu Center at General. “It really brings together my classroom work, prayer life, and preparation for ministry in a really tangible way,” commented one student.

Fresh Ministries is working with global partners to expand local small farmer aquaponics farming and use of green energy to end global hunger, develop sustainable agriculture, create equitable social systems and empower women and youth in South Africa, the Virgin Islands, and around the globe with Be The Change Africa, Conservation South Africa and the Desmond Tutu Program to End Global Hunger.

According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, agricultural production will have to increase by 60% by 2050 to feed the world and about 90% of the global food production increase needed by 2050 is projected to take place in developing countries, whose share of global food production will rise to 74% in 2050. Most of the expanding population growth in the areas will be urban, increasing the probability of poverty, malnutrition, and hunger in developing cities. Much of the persistent food insecurity in 2050, as it is today, will be found in poor households in low income countries, and in areas where depleted or degraded natural resources no longer support viable livelihood activities for small land holders. As with today, the primary cause for malnutrition and hunger will be persistent poverty.